Calvin – The Majesty of God

By Adam Smith

March 26th, 1538 – Easter Sunday, Geneva

My dear William,

It’s me, John Calvin.

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As I write to you now, I hear a mob at my door

An army of people calling, I can’t ignore

They want silence. They want me gone, William;

A pack packed with pitchforks and torches and clubs

Angry at truth, and calling for blood.

I came to Geneva, after your relentless pursuit

I accepted your offer and came to be absolutely firm in my conviction

To preach the gospel of Christ, and Christ alone.

But against your prediction, and depiction of this city, I’ve felt nothing but friction against the good news I bring, and now here I am threatened with eviction.

They don’t want to hear it. They don’t want a part.

They’ve put up a wall of hostility around the void in their heart

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For once in the past, an intervention divine,

when God subdued and made a teachable heart of mine

I saw in that moment all power and glory

The majesty of God revealed in the story

Of God and his people, in scripture complete

revelation of who he is and how to know him

Man creates a model of God, in one single plane

That is put in a containable box and constrained

To our weak definition, a flawed exposition

That fails to capture even a glimmer of God’s awesome composition

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The Reformation Overview (& the five ‘Solas’)

October 2017 is the 500th Anniversary of the start of the Protestant Reformation.

What is the Reformation?

Back in the 1400s people began to study in a new way. Universities were developing and there was a spirit of enquiry and questioning. It was the period we know as the Renaissance, which means ‘new birth’. A new age was dawning.

People (especially across Europe) began to question. Instead of merely reading what previous writers had said there was a great desire to go back to the sources, to the original documents. People were fascinated by the Greco-Roman empire and philosophers such as Plato and Aristotle and Socrates and Seneca and so on. Scholars translated the secular original texts and studied them in detail, and along with the philosophers they also began to study the biblical texts in the same way.

Now at this point in history, the late 1400s, early 1500s nobody read the Bible. The church told people what to believe and how to ensure their salvation. Many priests and monks had never read the scriptures. Some, like Ulrich Zwingli from Zurich were scared to even open the pages. Martin Luther (who would become a great German reformer) had studied to become a monk and a priest but did not even look at a Bible until he was 20 years of age.

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Ulrich Zwingli

When people like Luther and Zwingli and scholars such as Erasmus and others began to read they were amazed. They realised that what was recorded in scripture was very different to what was taught in the canon law of the church. They began to question the practices of the church and they began to question the doctrines that the church promoted.

Now Martin Luther was incensed that the church taxed people, fined and oppressed them and then offered salvation through good works. He began to speak out. He read in the Bible in the letter to the Romans that salvation is through faith alone, not through doing what the church told you and going through their practices and rituals.

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Martin Luther

He saw that faith in Jesus Christ is what is necessary for salvation. He wanted everyone to be able to read the scriptures just as he did so he translated the Bible into German. He no longer thought that you had to believe in what the church told you, if you wanted to know about the Christian faith then you only need to read the Bible, scripture alone.

During the 1520s Luther spoke out and people listened. A major upheaval began. People realised as they read the Bible that they did not have to pray to Mary, that statues of saints were of no value and that transubstantiation –  the idea that in the ritual of the communion mass the bread and wine becomes the actual body and blood of Christ –  had no scriptural foundation.

In Zurich at around the same time Ulrich Zwingli was coming to the same conclusions. The city took a vote to either follow the traditional thinking or to embrace the ‘new’ ideas. They chose the new way. Zwingli was appointed as priest of the cathedral and began preaching the New Testament to the people.

Across Europe the old ties with the Roman Catholic Church were being broken and people embraced the newly discovered, or recovered message of the scriptures.

They began to understand that it was by God’s grace alone, and not through any earned merit, that salvation was offered. And how does this come about? It comes about through Jesus Christ when God sent his son to take away our sins. It is by Christ alone that we can be saved. This is not what the church was teaching.

And they also learnt why this is so. It is for God’s glory, not for the church or the arch-bishops or the pope.  God did this for his glory alone. They called on the Church to reform.

Five Solas

And so, reform swept through the church and new churches and denominations were formed and more and more people were taught the biblical truths. They recognised that there were five key doctrinal points that were at the basis of the reform. Today we call them the five solas, using the Latin word for alone or only.

Sola Scriptura (“scripture alone”): The Bible alone is our highest authority.

Sola Fide (“faith alone”): We are saved through faith alone in Jesus Christ.

Sola Gratia (“grace alone”): We are saved by the grace of God alone.

Solus Christus (“Christ alone”): Jesus Christ alone is Saviour.

Soli Deo Gloria (“to the glory of God alone”): We live for the glory of God alone.

 

What does the Reformation mean for us today?

Five hundred years later it means the same as it did for those reformers. Through their reclaiming of the truths that are found in scripture we know that our salvation is secure. We know that Jesus has made that one true, perfect sacrifice for our sins. We know that the Bible is the record of God’s revelation of himself in Jesus Christ. And we know that we live for his glory.

The work of the Reformers reclaimed the eternal message that faith in Jesus brings salvation. Our lives are shaped by this fact. Our church is shaped by this fact. And our world is shaped by our Christian witness as we share the gospel which is the message of salvation, assurance and hope that we find in Jesus.

 

Glenn Clarke – Lecturer in Church History, Bible College of SA

What does a Christian do with the Bible?

What place should the Bible have in a Christians life? Any tips?

An essential Christian discipline is to read or listen to the Bible regularly through the week. It would be a shame if the secular news cycle had more of a voice into your life each week than the Word of God.

The battle to put the Word of God before the word of the world is ongoing. Each time you read or watch the news (an activity which in itself is not wrong), you subject yourself to the opinions of the journalist who is accountable only to an opinion that makes news! Our secular press are rarely accountable to anyone but their ratings – it is not difficult for truth to get lost or skewed in the pursuit of a growing readership.

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How can the Bible be from men but also from God?

How is it that the Bible arrives in the form we have it?

The Apostle Paul, along with Timothy, writing to the church in Thessalonica said:

‘we thank God continually because when you received the word of God, which you heard from us, you accepted it not as the word of men, but as it actually is, the word of God, which is at work in you who believe’                                       (1 Thessalonians 2:13)

The word received, was handled down by God through those who had first heard it and their job was to tell others.

Of course that begs the question – how can the Bible be from men but really from God? How can we be sure that humans who spoke and wrote actually have the spoken and written word that God wanted them to express?

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Listening to the Word

I had never read anything like it! It was amazing, it was as if the words were leaping off the page and calling out to me – these words were for me!

Those chariot journeys were a good time to read and reflect. Work was so busy and so much was asked of me. My day job is Head Official overseeing the Royal Treasury. I like the responsibility and I feel honoured to be working for the Ethiopian Queen making sure my people are provided for well. Not all eunuchs are given much respect so I know I am in a fortunate position.

I can’t tell you how I came across the scroll but I have to say it blew my mind.

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